pacify

pacify, appease, placate, mollify, propitiate, conciliate are comparable when they mean to quiet excited, aroused, or disturbed persons.
Pacify implies a soothing or calming of anger, grievance, or agitation, or the quelling of insurrection especially by force
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seeing his mounting rage, friends did all they could to pacify and restrain him

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second-grade troops, useful mainly to occupy parts of the country that have already been pacifiedCrozier

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Appease may indicate the quieting of agitation or insistent demand by the making of concessions
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open in manner, easy of access, a little quick of temper but readily appeasedBuchan

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he is utterly and absolutely implacable; no prayers, no human sacrifices can ever for one moment appease his cold, malignant rage— L. P. Smith

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and it may be used in reference to appetites, desires, and passions as well as persons and to imply a giving of quietening satis-faction
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there is always the drive to excel. Work, literacy, food and shelter ... are minimum requirements of civilization, but they will not appease this ambition— Edmund Wilson

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a frantic effort to appease mounting discontent at home— Willen

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Placate is sometimes interchangeable with appease but may imply a more complete or lasting assuagement of bitter feeling
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each and every new route projected was liable to drastic alteration to placate local opposition— O. S. Nock

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federal officials who try to placate witch-hunting Congressmen— New Republic

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Mollify stresses softening of anger or abatement of hurt feelings by positive action (as flattery or concession)
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the propagandist. . . must be able to mollify and perhaps even convert the hostile— Huxley

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mollified when they heard that the patio, with its famous Cottonwood tree will be left intact— Green Peyton

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Propitiate may refer to averting the anger or malevolence or winning the favor of a superior or of one possessing the power to injure greatly
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propitiate this far-shooting Apollo— Grote)}

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Aunty Rosa, he argued, had the power to beat him with many stripes ... it would be discreet in the future to propitiate Aunty Rosa— Kipling

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the unlimited power of trustees to abuse their trust unless they are abjectly propitiated— H. G. Wells

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Conciliate may be used of situations in which an estrangement or dispute is settled by arbitration or compromise
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policy of conciliating and amalgamating conquered nations— Repplier

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instinctively friendly and wholly free from inflammatory rhetoric, he did much to conciliate more stubborn Northern sentiment concerning the South— Gaines

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Analogous words: assuage, alleviate, allay, mitigate, *relieve: *moderate, qualify, temper
Antonyms: anger

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pacify — Pac i*fy, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pacified}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pacifying}.] [F. pacifier, L. pacificare; pax, pacis, peace + ficare (in comp.) to make. See {Peace}, and { fy}.] To make to be at peace; to appease; to calm; to still; to quiet; to allay …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pacify — [pas′ə fī΄] vt. pacified, pacifying [ME pacifien < OFr pacefier < L pacificare < pax (gen. pacis), PEACE + facere, to make, DO1] 1. to make peaceful or calm; appease; tranquilize 2. a) to establish or secure peace in (a …   English World dictionary

  • pacify — (v.) late 15c., from M.Fr. pacifier, from O.Fr., make peace, from L. pacificare to make peace, pacify, from pacificus (see PACIFIC (Cf. pacific)). Related: Pacified; pacifying …   Etymology dictionary

  • pacify — I verb accommodate, alleviate, appease, assuage, becalm, bring to terms, calm, componere, conciliate, dulcify, ease, lenire, make peace, mediate, mellow, mollify, pacificate, placare, placate, please, propitiate, quell, quiet, reconcile, relieve …   Law dictionary

  • pacify — [v] make peaceful; appease allay, ameliorate, assuage, bury the hatchet*, butter up*, calm, chasten, compose, con, conciliate, cool, dulcify, fix up, grease*, kiss and make up*, lay back, lull, make peace, mitigate, moderate, mollify, pacificate …   New thesaurus

  • pacify — ► VERB (pacifies, pacified) 1) quell the anger or agitation of. 2) bring peace to (a country or warring factions). DERIVATIVES pacification noun. ORIGIN Latin pacificare, from pax peace …   English terms dictionary

  • pacify — transitive verb ( fied; fying) Etymology: Middle English pacifien, from Anglo French pacifier, from Latin pacificare, from pac , pax peace Date: 15th century 1. a. to allay the anger or agitation of ; soothe < pacify a crying child > b …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • pacify — verb go out there and try to pacify the passengers Syn: placate, appease, calm (down), conciliate, propitiate, assuage, mollify, soothe Ant: enrage •• pacify, appease, conciliate, mollify, placate, propitiate You might try to pacify a crying baby …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • pacify — [[t]pæ̱sɪfaɪ[/t]] pacifies, pacifying, pacified 1) VERB If you pacify someone who is angry, upset, or not pleased, you succeed in making them calm or pleased. [V n] Is this a serious step, or is this just something to pacify the critics?... [V n] …   English dictionary

  • pacify — UK [ˈpæsɪfaɪ] / US [ˈpæsɪˌfaɪ] verb [transitive] Word forms pacify : present tense I/you/we/they pacify he/she/it pacifies present participle pacifying past tense pacified past participle pacified 1) to make someone who is angry, worried, or… …   English dictionary


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